Blog

Open post

A guide to capitalising titles and ranks

If you’ve ever had a hard time wrapping your head around when you should and shouldn’t capitalise words like ‘sergeant’, ‘doctor’, ‘queen’, and ‘sir’, you can be safe in the knowledge that you’re not alone. Probably about half of the manuscripts I edit contain capitalisation errors related to titles and ranks, and it crops...

Open post

Four ways theme can help you write with meaning

Despite being a highly neglected element of storytelling, theme is in fact one of the most powerful tools at your disposal as you plan, write, and revise your novel. In school, many of us learn to identify a theme as a single word or phrase, a broad topic explored in the story, like ‘love,’...

New services, new pricing structure

Happy New Year! To kick off 2019, I’ve decided to revamp my services and implement the feedback I’ve received from my clients and email subscribers regarding my pricing structure. What’s new? I’m excited to add a new option, the query critique, to my content editing services. It involves an assessment of your 1 page...

Open post

Review: The King’s Justice

I was recently fortunate enough to enjoy two weeks of holiday… so essentially two weeks in which to read whatever I wanted, regardless of genre. My initial plan was to read A Song of Ice and Fire – which I did, for a while anyway – but of course I eventually succumbed to my...

Open post

Five ways to fix a sagging middle

No, I promise I’m not moonlighting as a personal trainer. When I talk about a sagging middle, I’m referring to the way some stories lose their momentum as they reach the halfway point. It’s a common problem – affecting perhaps 10 per cent of the manuscripts I edit – but the good news is...

Open post

When (and how) to use documents in historical fiction

In historical fiction, it’s common for writers to include documents, such as letters, diary entries, and newspaper reports, in their stories. These can be real documents from the period they’re writing about, or they can be fictional documents they’ve created themselves. Either way, documents can be a good way of enriching a story if you...

Open post

The benefits and challenges of third person limited

Third person limited is one of the most popular viewpoints, and it’s not hard to see why. It allows us to escape the confines of a single character’s head, but there’s still plenty of scope for the reader to form an emotional connection to the story. That said, in the wrong hands, third person...

Open post

How to write flashbacks

Flashbacks are an important part of storytelling, enabling writers to connect the events and actions of the present to things that have happened in the past. They’re a particularly useful tool for demonstrating character motivations and introducing plot twists. If done right, they can pack a powerful emotional punch and pull the reader further...

Open post

Five common comma mistakes (and how to avoid them)

Most manuscripts I edit contain some grammatical errors, and most of these relate to commas. Good comma usage can improve the flow of your story, add dramatic tension, and give the reader confidence in your writing abilities. Bad comma usage can make your writing seem unprofessional and ruin an otherwise good novel. To help you...

Top